Photo 2 Jul 107 notes parislemon:

Fascinating map. Also sort of crazy: California isn’t (yet) Apple country.
Chevron had $220 billion in revenue last year to Apple’s $170 billion. But Apple had far more net income — roughly $14 billion more, nearly double Chevron. That’s how profitable Apple’s business is.



Also sort of crazy that Amazon’s revenue still trails Costco.

parislemon:

Fascinating map. Also sort of crazy: California isn’t (yet) Apple country.

Chevron had $220 billion in revenue last year to Apple’s $170 billion. But Apple had far more net income — roughly $14 billion more, nearly double Chevron. That’s how profitable Apple’s business is.

Also sort of crazy that Amazon’s revenue still trails Costco.
via ParisLemon.
Photo 21 Jun (From the wall of an investment bank in Vienna.) Unless this tag line translates into two German words, time to get a better marketing team. ;)

(From the wall of an investment bank in Vienna.) Unless this tag line translates into two German words, time to get a better marketing team. ;)

Photo 3 May 71 notes parislemon:

penllawen:

So to recap:

"Please don’t update unless you’re using ePrint." (I am trying to set up ePrint. It fails with a generic error message that the Internet suggests is fixable via a firmware upgrade.)
"There is a serious problem." (No explanation of problem.)
"HP is working on a fix." (Dated SEVEN MONTHS AGO.)
And the “live support” link goes to a premium service because of course it does.
This is the worst thing in the world.

Undecided if this says more about the state of HP or the state of printers.

parislemon:

penllawen:

So to recap:

  • "Please don’t update unless you’re using ePrint." (I am trying to set up ePrint. It fails with a generic error message that the Internet suggests is fixable via a firmware upgrade.)
  • "There is a serious problem." (No explanation of problem.)
  • "HP is working on a fix." (Dated SEVEN MONTHS AGO.)
  • And the “live support” link goes to a premium service because of course it does.

This is the worst thing in the world.

Undecided if this says more about the state of HP or the state of printers.

via ParisLemon.
Link 18 Mar 1,204 notes Did Malaysian Airlines 370 disappear using SIA68/SQ68 (another 777)?»

This theory actually makes sense… 

keithledgerwood:

It is my belief that MH370 likely flew in the shadow of SIA68 through India and Afghanistan airspace.  As MH370 was flying “dark” without transponder / ADS-B output, SIA68 would have had no knowledge that MH370 was anywhere around and as it entered Indian airspace, it would have shown up as one single blip on the radar with only the transponder information of SIA68 lighting up ATC and military radar screens.

Quote 28 Feb
When we work on making our devices accessible by the blind, I don’t consider the bloody ROI.
— Tim Cook, CEO of Apple…
Awesome!
Photo 16 Jan 209 notes 
spytap:
The future is so great!

Please try again FCC… 


spytap:

The future is so great!

Please try again FCC… 

via ParisLemon.
Photo 2 Dec 1,096 notes 
thenextweb:
"Your Amazon Drone delivery was unable to be completed because…"
(Image: @QuantumPirate)

thenextweb:

"Your Amazon Drone delivery was unable to be completed because…"

(Image: @QuantumPirate)


via ParisLemon.
Photo 20 Nov Microsoft has marked down Google Drive and Dropbox for not having “remote access”. Apparently, their users need to drive up to a Google or Dropbox datacenter to access their files. Who knew?… :-) 

Microsoft has marked down Google Drive and Dropbox for not having “remote access”. Apparently, their users need to drive up to a Google or Dropbox datacenter to access their files. Who knew?… :-) 

Text 8 Nov "Future" Timeline of Elop’s Reign at Microsoft

June 13, 2014: After a ten month search, Microsoft board names Stephen Elop, the former CEO of Nokia, as the company’s next CEO. A spokesman brushes of light hearted comments from the media about the omens of making the announcement on Friday the 13th. 

August 19, 2014: In his first press conference as Microsoft’s CEO, Elop announces that he will not dignify conspiracy theories about him acting as a mole and willfully damaging Nokia’s fortunes before its takeover by Microsoft, his prior and future employer, by commenting on the allegations. 

January 21, 2015: Elop’s memo about the need to accept the dominance of iOS and Android against Windows leaks to the media. The memo underlines his concern that  lack of a native Office suite for these operating systems is already hurting the services side of Microsoft. 

January 23, 2015: As the furor over the leaked memo grows, Microsoft calls a seemingly hasty press conference. Elop announces native versions of Office for iOS and Android to be released in a year. Microsoft also sunsets Windows version of Office, to be effective immediately, citing the small market share of Windows PCs in an era where most computing devices are mobile and pointing out the need to focus on the gargantuan task of porting the productivity suite to two new operating systems. 

June 12, 2015: Microsoft issues an earning warning due to sharp drop off in sales of its Office suite. Elop claims he is unfazed and calls the falling market share “bitter, but vital medicine” to secure the company’s long term future. He seems particularly happy to be vindicated that his actions at Nokia were undertaken in good faith, as he is obviously implementing a similar turnaround plan for his alleged pay master. He later admonishes business reporters for failing to understand that it is not possible right a ship this size without setting it on fire first. 

Link 8 Nov 34 notes Twitter leaves more than $1 billion on the table»

parislemon:

Dan Primack:

Twitter itself obviously wanted a bit of price pop for PR and employee morale purposes, but here’s something else employees could be thinking about today: Had Twitter priced at $45.10 per share and used the extra proceeds to give out holiday bonuses, it would have worked out to more than $580,000 per employee. How’s your morale feel now?

It is interesting that Facebook maximized the amount of money it made by going public, and it was viewed as a “failure”. While Twitter clearly left a ton of money on the table, and that’s viewed as a “success”.

This is a case where perception is reality. But let’s be clear, the real winners today are the same ones who were the real losers of the Facebook IPO: the bankers.

via ParisLemon.

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